News and Opinions

News and opinions from TBTT
Posted Tshegofatso Senne on 2021-02-25

Fighting patriarchy and ableism through pleasure work. Defining what pleasure is. Compiling Online Gender Based Violence (OGBV) research. Being kinky, queer and vulnerable online. Interviewing sex workers, coaches writers, researchers and artists. Embracing queer identity in the face of online violence. Understanding the experiences of African women who had faced various consequences due to OGBV...

Posted Christy Alves Nascimiento on 2020-12-02

It was as a martial arts practitioner that I first learnt the dark irony of violence. It very rarely looks like an anonymous attacker or a dark alleyway. It also doesn’t go around seeking a randomised, weak and vulnerable-looking target either. Rather, it shows up as an exercise of power by a mentor we respect, or by an intimate partner we love. It shows up in our schools, gym classes and news...

Posted on 2020-11-30

Shorgol presents brief stories regarding experiences and conversations around sexual agency and rights and the digital space. The illustrated stories are based on case studies, research and in-depth discussions with university-aged youth in the community. This graphic story is the result of research by an All Women Count - Take Back the Tech! grantee in 2020.

Posted Foundation for Media Alternatives (FMA) on 2020-08-03

This piece was originally published by the Foundation for Media Alternatives (FMA). You can also consult their recent analysis, using the TBTT mapping tool, of online gender-based violence in the Philippines in this article. While the Internet has grown to become a basic need for people to access information, services, and form social connections and communities, it similarly allows for same...

Posted APC Women’s Rights Programme (WRP) on 2020-05-18

The world is suddenly and radically changed. But this is not the radical change that we as feminists, activists, thinkers and campaigners had hoped for. At the APC Women’s Rights Programme (WRP) we believe in putting people at the centre and leading with care and responsibility for each other, ourselves and the planet. We work towards imagining and making a feminist internet, and as much as the...

Posted on 2019-11-25

Take Back the Tech! is a campaign that reclaims the internet and women's often ignored herstory with technology, exploring and encouraging the creative use of digital technologies to denounce and eliminate online gender-based violence (GBV). Its name echoes back to the Take Back the Night marches all over the world, where women reclaimed public streets as their own, especially at night when they...

Posted Florie Dumas-Kemp on 2019-11-20

A daisy with a blurry pastel background, a sunset in an enchanting landscape, more flowers, coffee cups... If you are a Whatsapp user, you've probably encountered them a lot: “good morning” forwards. They might be flowing through your Whatsapp family groups, you might forward them yourself or you might be tired of seeing them everyday. Apparently, these specific forwards are so popular around...

Posted on 2019-10-22

For Take Back the Tech! the internet is a space for play, exploration, experimentation and learning, as well as a vital political space of free association and expression. That’s why we created a series of online sharing sessions so that TBTT campaigners and other curious cyberfeminists from all over the world can participate, create and put their knowledge into action to occupy the internet...

Posted Florencia Goldsman on 2019-10-04

The movements denouncing sexual violence are unstoppable. We noted this in our previous post and questions continue to emerge: some focus on the way people are publicly shamed in "escraches"*, others on whether the internet is a legitimate place to denounce violence, and about its characteristics with respect to the over-exposure of both the victims and the aggressors. In order to follow up on...

Posted Florencia Goldsman on 2019-06-24

Why do women still have to file reports of violence anonymously? Because we are talking about things that no one ever imagined. Why do we choose to do it over social media platforms? Because (for now) they remain the most accessible bridge to a large number of people. How can confidentiality be preserved at a time when there is an urgent need to publicly shame aggressors? Find out in this article